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Digest of Charlton County Herald - May 1924

Compiled by Lois Barefoot Mays


May 2, 1924

WEDDING. A wedding of unusual beauty was that of Miss Susie Mizell and Dr. Albert Fleming which was solemnized Wednesday at the home of the bride's parents in Folkston. Immediately after the ceremony Dr. and Mrs. Fleming left for a motor trip through Florida.

WEDDING. Miss Mabell Hendrix and Mr. E.D. Mizell were happily married in Folkston Saturday. Mr. Mizell is well and favorably known in Charlton County as a young man of many sterling qualities and business ability. The bride is the charming daughter of Mr. and Mrs. T.M. Hendrix and one of the most popular young ladies in the community.

TRAINS DISCONTINUED. The Floridian and Dixie Limited, fast north and southbound trains, will be discontinued by the Atlantic Coast Line now that the northern tourist season is practically over. The trains were run regularly every day and the last trip was made Wednesday, when the trains went north and will not return until next fall.

DELEGATES ATTEND CONVENTION. Mr. C.W. Waughtel and Mr. E.F. Dean, Sr. went to Atlanta this week to attend the convention of the Republican Party.

MR. E.C. CRAWFORD DIED. Mr. E.C. Crawford, a well known citizens of this county, died at his home near Toledo last Friday. He is survived by his widow and several small children. May 9, 1924

WAYCROSS TOBACCO WAREHOUSE. Business men in Waycross are making an effort to secure the establishment of a tobacco warehouse there.

UNUSUAL PET ANIMAL. Last Saturday afternoon a very unusual visitor made its appearance in the Herald office. The visitor was a beautiful mild-eyed deer, led by Otto Martin. This deer was captured when small and is quite tame.

NOTICE: Dues for the Folkston Woman's Civic Club are now $2.00, but if a member wishes this may be paid $1.00 now and $1.00 in six months.

PICKREN BABY DIED. Since going to press the news of the death of the little baby son of Mr. and Mrs. Taylor L. Pickren reached us. He died Friday morning at Argyle, and will be buried in the Folkston cemetery Saturday afternoon.

NEW BABY. A fine baby boy was born to Mr. and Mrs. Ollie Ryles May 2nd.

NEW BABY. Mr. and Mrs. Fred Askew announce the birth of a fine baby girl on May 3rd.

May 16, 1924

MR. W.L. SPENCER DIED IN FIRE. Mr. W.L. Spencer was burned to death in a fire which consumed his home near Kent just across the St. Marys River from St. George Friday afternoon. The funeral was held in St. George Saturday.

1924 GRADUATING CLASS. The graduating class of the Charlton County High School includes Pearl Allen, Margaret Garrison, Thelma Gowen, Mildred Littlefield and Violet Martin. An elaborate program for the entire week has been planned and will end with graduation on May 30th.

LITTLE JUNIOR PICKREN DIED. Again death has broken into a happy home circle and took away little Junior Pickren, the ten-months-old son and only child of Mr. and Mrs. Taylor L. Pickren, to realms where there is no sorrow or suffering. Mrs. Pickren and little Junior were visiting her mother in Argyle when sickness struck him and after a week of intense suffering death came to relieve the little body and brought sadness to the hearts of his loved ones. He was tenderly laid to rest in the Folkston cemetery Saturday afternoon.

MR. A.L. SMITH DIED. A.L. Smith died at his home in St. George last Tuesday night and was buried in the cemetery there Thursday afternoon. The funeral was held at the family home. "Daddy" Smith, as he was affectionately called by his friends, came to St. George in the early days, and with his good wife who survives him, established the Smith Hotel. Born near Columbus Grove, Ohio on April 21, 1844, he was married to Sarah Tousley on 28 of May, 1881. He came to St. George from Columbus Grove in 1905 and has remained here ever since. His surviving children include Mrs. C.E. Stroup, Mrs. W.T. Londeree.

CHILDREN IN NEED. Last Tuesday there was camping in the city camping grounds a family consisting of five adults and 14 or 15 children claiming to be in destitute circumstances. The three men were able-bodied and looked amply able to work. The children, from five to twelve years of age, combed the town begging for money, food and clothes. No telling where they will go next, but something should be done for these children.

MR. AND MRS. WHITE VISIT. Mr. and Mrs. George White and two little sons of Waycross spent this week visiting friends in Homeland and looking after their Homeland farm. They sold their range cattle while there.

May 23, 1924

COURTNEY HOME DESTROYED BY FIRE. The home of Mrs. Nellie Courtney was completely destroyed by fire Saturday afternoon. When discovered the fire had gained considerable headway covering the kitchen and dining room. She was upstairs when she discovered the blaze coming in the windows. She only had time to snatch up some of her clothing and push her trunk down the stairway. The furniture upstairs was burned and the furniture downstairs was partly saved. This was one of the oldest houses in Folkston, built of heart lumber which went up in smoke in a short time.

JOSEPH WILLIAM DAVIS BORN. Mr. and Mrs. Nelson Davis announce the birth of a fine son in Hardeeville, N.C. on May 16th. The little boy has been named Joseph William.

DR. MCLAUGHLIN HERE. Dr. A.T. McLaughlin announces that May 30 will be the first day he will be in Folkston, after that he will be here every Friday. He has an office in Mrs. E.L. Martin's home.

NEW BARBER. Roy Braddock has opened a barber shop in the old stand occupied by the City Barber Shop.

May 30, 1924

COTTON CROP. In the past two issues we requested all who were growing cotton to let us know the acreage that each one had planted. Two have reported. Gabor Enyedy has three acres planted at St. George and Ed Davis reports that he has two acres of mighty fine cotton growing in Folkston.

POSSIBLE NEW INDUSTRY FOR SOUTH. Eyes of the paper-making industry are turning toward the South in search of more continuous supplies of raw materials and it is believed the South is the coming center of paper-making.

TOBACCO AND TOMATOES. Several of our tobacco growers are replanting missing places with tomatoes. Mr. Wrench supplies plants on a basis of a thousand for a bushel of fruit. You will make no mistake planting a big patch.

May 1924 May 2, 1924 WEDDING. A wedding of unusual beauty was that of Miss Susie Mizell and Dr. Albert Fleming which was solemnized Wednesday at the home of the bride's parents in Folkston. Immediately after the ceremony Dr. and Mrs. Fleming left for a motor trip through Florida. WEDDING. Miss Mabell Hendrix and Mr. E.D. Mizell were happily married in Folkston Saturday. Mr. Mizell is well and favorably known in Charlton County as a young man of many sterling qualities and business ability. The bride is the charming daughter of Mr. and Mrs. T.M. Hendrix and one of the most popular young ladies in the community. TRAINS DISCONTINUED. The Floridian and Dixie Limited, fast north and southbound trains, will be discontinued by the Atlantic Coast Line now that the northern tourist season is practically over. The trains were run regularly every day and the last trip was made Wednesday, when the trains went north and will not return until next fall. DELEGATES ATTEND CONVENTION. Mr. C.W. Waughtel and Mr. E.F. Dean, Sr. went to Atlanta this week to attend the convention of the Republican Party. MR. E.C. CRAWFORD DIED. Mr. E.C. Crawford, a well known citizens of this county, died at his home near Toledo last Friday. He is survived by his widow and several small children. May 9, 1924 WAYCROSS TOBACCO WAREHOUSE. Business men in Waycross are making an effort to secure the establishment of a tobacco warehouse there. UNUSUAL PET ANIMAL. Last Saturday afternoon a very unusual visitor made its appearance in the Herald office. The visitor was a beautiful mild-eyed deer, led by Otto Martin. This deer was captured when small and is quite tame. NOTICE: Dues for the Folkston Woman's Civic Club are now $2.00, but if a member wishes this may be paid $1.00 now and $1.00 in six months. PICKREN BABY DIED. Since going to press the news of the death of the little baby son of Mr. and Mrs. Taylor L. Pickren reached us. He died Friday morning at Argyle, and will be buried in the Folkston cemetery Saturday afternoon. NEW BABY. A fine baby boy was born to Mr. and Mrs. Ollie Ryles May 2nd. NEW BABY. Mr. and Mrs. Fred Askew announce the birth of a fine baby girl on May 3rd. May 16, 1924 MR. W.L. SPENCER DIED IN FIRE. Mr. W.L. Spencer was burned to death in a fire which consumed his home near Kent just across the St. Marys River from St. George Friday afternoon. The funeral was held in St. George Saturday. 1924 GRADUATING CLASS. The graduating class of the Charlton County High School includes Pearl Allen, Margaret Garrison, Thelma Gowen, Mildred Littlefield and Violet Martin. An elaborate program for the entire week has been planned and will end with graduation on May 30th. LITTLE JUNIOR PICKREN DIED. Again death has broken into a happy home circle and took away little Junior Pickren, the ten-months-old son and only child of Mr. and Mrs. Taylor L. Pickren, to realms where there is no sorrow or suffering. Mrs. Pickren and little Junior were visiting her mother in Argyle when sickness struck him and after a week of intense suffering death came to relieve the little body and brought sadness to the hearts of his loved ones. He was tenderly laid to rest in the Folkston cemetery Saturday afternoon. MR. A.L. SMITH DIED. A.L. Smith died at his home in St. George last Tuesday night and was buried in the cemetery there Thursday afternoon. The funeral was held at the family home. "Daddy" Smith, as he was affectionately called by his friends, came to St. George in the early days, and with his good wife who survives him, established the Smith Hotel. Born near Columbus Grove, Ohio on April 21, 1844, he was married to Sarah Tousley on 28 of May, 1881. He came to St. George from Columbus Grove in 1905 and has remained here ever since. His surviving children include Mrs. C.E. Stroup, Mrs. W.T. Londeree. CHILDREN IN NEED. Last Tuesday there was camping in the city camping grounds a family consisting of five adults and 14 or 15 children claiming to be in destitute circumstances. The three men were able-bodied and looked amply able to work. The children, from five to twelve years of age, combed the town begging for money, food and clothes. No telling where they will go next, but something should be done for these children. MR. AND MRS. WHITE VISIT. Mr. and Mrs. George White and two little sons of Waycross spent this week visiting friends in Homeland and looking after their Homeland farm. They sold their range cattle while there. May 23, 1924 COURTNEY HOME DESTROYED BY FIRE. The home of Mrs. Nellie Courtney was completely destroyed by fire Saturday afternoon. When discovered the fire had gained considerable headway covering the kitchen and dining room. She was upstairs when she discovered the blaze coming in the windows. She only had time to snatch up some of her clothing and push her trunk down the stairway. The furniture upstairs was burned and the furniture downstairs was partly saved. This was one of the oldest houses in Folkston, built of heart lumber which went up in smoke in a short time. JOSEPH WILLIAM DAVIS BORN. Mr. and Mrs. Nelson Davis announce the birth of a fine son in Hardeeville, N.C. on May 16th. The little boy has been named Joseph William. DR. MCLAUGHLIN HERE. Dr. A.T. McLaughlin announces that May 30 will be the first day he will be in Folkston, after that he will be here every Friday. He has an office in Mrs. E.L. Martin's home. NEW BARBER. Roy Braddock has opened a barber shop in the old stand occupied by the City Barber Shop. May 30, 1924 COTTON CROP. In the past two issues we requested all who were growing cotton to let us know the acreage that each one had planted. Two have reported. Gabor Enyedy has three acres planted at St. George and Ed Davis reports that he has two acres of mighty fine cotton growing in Folkston. POSSIBLE NEW INDUSTRY FOR SOUTH. Eyes of the paper-making industry are turning toward the South in search of more continuous supplies of raw materials and it is believed the South is the coming center of paper-making. TOBACCO AND TOMATOES. Several of our tobacco growers are replanting missing places with tomatoes. Mr. Wrench supplies plants on a basis of a thousand for a bushel of fruit. You will make no mistake planting a big patch.

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Charlton  County Archives